Front Garden Ideas

Front Garden Ideas

Most Popular Getty Martin Leigh Author Created with Sketch. By Caroline Tilston 31 August 2016 Front gardens are special and very different from rear gardens, for a start they are for show not for relaxation, and for kerb appeal not for parties and play.It might be different but it’s really worth while – because in reality, for much of the year we are likely to see more of our front garden than our back. Every time we walk to our car or out of our house, whatever the weather, we’ll be immersed in this garden, so the daily benefits of having something great to look are huge.Advertisement – Continue Reading BelowGolden rulesWe’ll start with the seven golden rules, follow these and all will fall into place.1. Fit in with the street scene. Every road has a ‘look’ and if you take your front garden too far away from what’s normal for your street, you will create a ‘wow’ but not in a good way – children will point and stare. But you can still raise the tone, if other front gardens in your street are neglected you can go for quietly smart. And if every other garden has been made over like a daytime TV programme, you might have to work a bit harder. If in doubt go for low key, neat and formal. Most Popular2. Symmetry and structure will give a great look. So look for well defined flower beds, straight lines and solid planting. The hardest look to pull off in a front garden is a wildflower meadow with plants flowing everywhere – go for the opposite of this and you’ll be on the right tracks.3. Structure like this will also work in winter as well as summer – and winter is a key time in the front garden, this will likely be your one glimpse of greenery on your way from house to car, so getting the winter look right is crucial. The shapes of the flower beds will be seen, and the structural bones are visible in winter, so it’s essential to make sure those bones look good. Related ArticleFront garden guide: Design ideas to suit terraced, semi-detached and detached houses Advertisement – Continue Reading Below4. The layout – the bones of the garden – needs to signal where people should go. It’s an obvious point but one that’s often forgotten. When folks walk to your house the front garden needs to show them the way to the front door – it’s purpose, if you like, is to direct. The easiest way to do this is with a clear path and a big signal to mark the front door. Big pots either side of the front door will do the job – they say ‘hey look over here, this is where you need to go!’5. When you’re putting in the structure, work with the house and the windows. So planting is high between the windows, low in front of them. Accentuate the patterns of house, don’t work against them. This will often give you a good pattern to copy around the rest of the front garden. The pace of the lower and higher planting can be used at the sides and alongside the road. Use the same spacing and the whole thing will come together like a symphony.6. You may not think about selling right now, but it’s likely to happen at some point, so if you’re putting money and effort into your front garden think about kerb appeal to buyers. What would you like to see if you were thinking about buying this house? It’s another really good reason to avoid anything whacky at the front. Kerb appeal is about looking neat and well maintained, cared about and pretty darned sensible. 7. Finally, watch out for planning rules. These are often specific to front gardens and can cover anything from the height of your front fence to the colour of your house. To find out what applies in your area the planning department of your local council will be a good place to start. If in doubt – check it out. Getty Ron Evans Related Gallery10 common front garden mistakes – and how to avoid them Perfect plants The main requirements for plants in a front garden is that they give structure and don’t take too much looking after. They need to be steady, not glamourous. 1. Evergreens. Shrubs which stay green and have a good bulk all year round – are key to front gardens. Try box or yew, hebes or sarcococcas. Choose the size you need to create your look and one of these will fit the bill. Advertisement – Continue Reading Below
front garden ideas 1

Front Garden Ideas

Getty Martin Leigh Author Created with Sketch. By Caroline Tilston 31 August 2016 Front gardens are special and very different from rear gardens, for a start they are for show not for relaxation, and for kerb appeal not for parties and play.It might be different but it’s really worth while – because in reality, for much of the year we are likely to see more of our front garden than our back. Every time we walk to our car or out of our house, whatever the weather, we’ll be immersed in this garden, so the daily benefits of having something great to look are huge.Advertisement – Continue Reading BelowGolden rulesWe’ll start with the seven golden rules, follow these and all will fall into place.1. Fit in with the street scene. Every road has a ‘look’ and if you take your front garden too far away from what’s normal for your street, you will create a ‘wow’ but not in a good way – children will point and stare. But you can still raise the tone, if other front gardens in your street are neglected you can go for quietly smart. And if every other garden has been made over like a daytime TV programme, you might have to work a bit harder. If in doubt go for low key, neat and formal. Most Popular2. Symmetry and structure will give a great look. So look for well defined flower beds, straight lines and solid planting. The hardest look to pull off in a front garden is a wildflower meadow with plants flowing everywhere – go for the opposite of this and you’ll be on the right tracks.3. Structure like this will also work in winter as well as summer – and winter is a key time in the front garden, this will likely be your one glimpse of greenery on your way from house to car, so getting the winter look right is crucial. The shapes of the flower beds will be seen, and the structural bones are visible in winter, so it’s essential to make sure those bones look good. Related ArticleFront garden guide: Design ideas to suit terraced, semi-detached and detached houses Advertisement – Continue Reading Below4. The layout – the bones of the garden – needs to signal where people should go. It’s an obvious point but one that’s often forgotten. When folks walk to your house the front garden needs to show them the way to the front door – it’s purpose, if you like, is to direct. The easiest way to do this is with a clear path and a big signal to mark the front door. Big pots either side of the front door will do the job – they say ‘hey look over here, this is where you need to go!’5. When you’re putting in the structure, work with the house and the windows. So planting is high between the windows, low in front of them. Accentuate the patterns of house, don’t work against them. This will often give you a good pattern to copy around the rest of the front garden. The pace of the lower and higher planting can be used at the sides and alongside the road. Use the same spacing and the whole thing will come together like a symphony.6. You may not think about selling right now, but it’s likely to happen at some point, so if you’re putting money and effort into your front garden think about kerb appeal to buyers. What would you like to see if you were thinking about buying this house? It’s another really good reason to avoid anything whacky at the front. Kerb appeal is about looking neat and well maintained, cared about and pretty darned sensible. 7. Finally, watch out for planning rules. These are often specific to front gardens and can cover anything from the height of your front fence to the colour of your house. To find out what applies in your area the planning department of your local council will be a good place to start. If in doubt – check it out. Getty Ron Evans Related Gallery10 common front garden mistakes – and how to avoid them Perfect plants The main requirements for plants in a front garden is that they give structure and don’t take too much looking after. They need to be steady, not glamourous. 1. Evergreens. Shrubs which stay green and have a good bulk all year round – are key to front gardens. Try box or yew, hebes or sarcococcas. Choose the size you need to create your look and one of these will fit the bill. Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Front Garden Ideas

Front Garden Ideas
Front Garden Ideas
Front Garden Ideas
Front Garden Ideas
Front Garden Ideas